Random vs. Structured Doodling

Echo Doodling, Lori Kennedy

Good Morning Afternoon, Quilters! (I’m off to a late-start!)

We are back to Doodle Lessons!

RANDOM VS. STRUCTURED DOODLING

As you know, I am an inveterate doodler.  Most of my doodles are random scribbles, but every night I sit down for awhile and work on more structured doodling–that is, I have a plan–something I’m trying to work out, like a new motif or a new whole cloth quilt design.  Both types of doodling are necessary.  Random scribbles help create a flowing hand movement and develop a signature style.  YOUR doodles are YOUR signature! No two people will have the same style.

Structured doodles help you plan your quilts.  When doing structured doodles, you might have a quilt shape like a triangle or a rectangle that you are trying to find the right motif to fit into it. Or, you are trying to determine the proportions of a motif that will fit into your quilt.  Use structured doodling to figure out the best way to travel from one motif to another within a quilt block or between quilt blocks.

It’s all still doodling, but there’s a plan.

Echo Doodling, Lori Kennedy

ECHO DOODLING 

The photos today of how I might practice echo quilting an appliqué block.

Start by closely echo stitching the main motif.  Echo stitching causes the appliqué to “pop”.  Echo stitch around the central motif several times until you “bump into” another shape.

 

Echo Doodling, Lori Kennedy

Echo stitch around the next motif several times until you “bump into” another motif.

Echo Doodling, Lori Kennedy

Occasionally you will get caught in a corner…use your doodling to figure out a way to travel or plan to knot off there and begin in a new area of the quilt.

Echo Doodles, Lori Kennedy

Try this with a few small doodles and then try it with a larger square…

And of course…

Stitch one of your favorites!

Remember our motto:  “Better Quilting through Doodling!”

Lori

PS…All tutorials, images and information are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to re-blog, pin or share with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!

Doodling The Flame

Flame Doodle, LKennedyGood Afternoon, Quilters and Doodlers!

Thank you so much for joining me in welcoming our grandson, Henry!  He’s already rocked our world (and sleep!)

Today we are back to doodling our way to better quilting with “The Flame”.

Flame Doodle, LKennedy

Practice The Flame one side at a time.  First draw the left side several times, then the right side, then combine both sides.

To draw The Flame, draw a straight line then a curve, then flatten out to the tip.

To complete the pattern, mirror the first side.
Flame Doodle, LKennedyOnce you are comfortable with the Flame, add vein lines to create a leaf or other lines to decorate inside or outside.

Flame Doodle, LKennedy

Flame Doodle, LKennedySee how many different combinations you can create.

Choose a few and try free motion quilting them in different sizes.
Flame Doodle, LKennedyAt first, the pattern will feel very mechanical and will require concentration.

Later, allow yourself to move fluidly even if it means the mirror image is not perfect.  (It’s impossible to create perfectly symmetrical Flames.)

To encourage even more fluid movements, draw the Flame in different sizes and on unlined paper.
Flame Doodle, LKennedyCommit to doodling 15 minutes per day for one month and I GUARANTEE your free motion quilting will improve!

Find all the Doodle Tutorials HERE

Happy Doodling!

Lori

PS…All tutorials, images and information are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to re-blog, pin or share with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!

 

 

Four Easy Steps to Perfectly Quilted Spirals

Spirals are frequently used in free-motion quilting, but they can be deceptively difficult to get right.

Here are four steps to perfect spirals:

  1. Begin with a “Rail”.  This can be a quilted line or a drawn line that will be erased later.
  2. Stitch to the top rail and curve down, but finish the lower part of your spiral above the bottom rail.  This allows space for the “Escape”
  3. Continue to curve inward and stop in the middle (at the X).
  4. Now reverse direction and bisect the lines you have already created.

Curve up to the top rail, but above the bottom rail

Stop in the middle– a little to the right.

Reverse direction and bisect the lines you have already created.

That’s it!  Easy as pie!  (And we all know how easy pies are to make!?)

Over the next several days, I will add many, many motifs that employ spirals….

We’ve only just begun!