How to Quilt a Guitar Motif

Machine Quilter Guitar Motif, Lori Kennedy

Good Morning, Quilters!

Today’s tutorial, How to Quilt a Guitar Motif, is one YOU requested. I am working on creating continuous line designs for motif requests from readers.  Please let me know if there is a motif YOU would like to see.  No promises, but I will try.

Today we are stitching a Guitar. In this pattern, we are striving for a hand-drawn look.  If your motifs aren’t perfect–(mine are not either!)–don’t worry!

If you stitch the essence of a guitar, everyone will read it as a guitar!

Let’s get strumming…

THE GUITAR MOTIF–A MACHINE QUILTING TUTORIAL

Begin by stitching a bean shape.
Machine Quilter Guitar Motif, Lori Kennedy

Near the center, stitch a clockwise circle.Machine Quilter Guitar Motif, Lori Kennedy

 

Stitch around the “sound hole” twice, ending on the right side of the guitar.Machine Quilter Guitar Motif, Lori Kennedy

Close the base of the guitar and closely echo stitch the left side, stopping below the level of the sound hole.

Machine Quilter Guitar Motif, Lori Kennedy

Stitch a horizontal line and echo stitch back-to create the bridge of the guitar.  Then stitch a long vertical line with a rectangle on top.

Machine Quilter Guitar Motif, Lori Kennedy  

To create the strings, stitch several closely spaced lines from the head of the guitar (the rectangle) to the bridge.

Stop several stitches above the body of the guitar.

Machine Quilter Guitar Motif, Lori Kennedy

Echo stitch the body of the guitar.  Stitch a wide margin on one side to give the guitar dimension…and a narrow echo stitch on the other.  Closely echo stitch the neck and head of the guitar.
Machine Quilter Guitar Motif, Lori Kennedy

To use the motif as a fill, echo stitch to any place along the guitar to begin another instrument.

Machine Quilter Guitar Motif, Lori Kennedy

Machine Quilter Guitar Motif, Lori Kennedy

This motif is not a “quick and easy” motif-however, with a little doodling it is a great way to add personality to your quilt. A little goes a long way. You don’t need to fill an entire quilt with a guitar motif.  Use this motif to fill a central square or a corner block where it will get the most visibility.

What about YOU?

Are YOU musical?

Do YOU play the guitar or any other instrument?

Do YOU have a motif you would like to learn?

We’d LOVE to hear!

Tomorrow–BIG CHANGES in my Sewing Studio!!!

May YOUR stitches be musical,

Lori Yamaha

PS…If you like these motifs and tips, be sure to check out my book, Free Motion Machine Quilting 1-2-3 or any of my Craftsy Videos!

PPS…All tutorials, images and information are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to re-blog, pin or share with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!

 

 

 

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How to Quilt Triangle Pop

 

How to Quilt Triangle Texture, Lori Kennedy, FMQGood Morning, Quilters!

One of my favorite texture motifs is Grid Pop.  I use it frequently in my quilts including Mr. Nutcracker and Fall Harvest.

Free Motion Quilting, Pumpkin, Acorn, Oak Leaf

The Grid Pop technique can easily be modified to create texture in different shapes.

If your quilt has a lot of diamonds, you might want to create “Diamond Pop” and if your quilt has a lot of triangles, “Triangle Pop” might suit your quilt better.

STITCH TRIANGLE POP IN A SASHING

Triangle Pop is a great motif to fill a sashing or narrow border!  I recently used this in a quilt with a two-inch sashing.

Kimberly Einmo Quilt, Lori Kennedy Quilt

DETERMINE THE PROPORTIONS

The first thing you will need to do is determine the proportions.  In the sample below, I started with a two inch strip to replicate sashing.

 

How to Quilt Triangle Texture, Lori Kennedy, FMQDraw a centerline between the two drawn lines (or seamlines if this quilting a sashing strip).

(I used a Clover Chalk Triangle-but any marking tool will work!)

In this case the centerline is one inch from each line.

(If your sashing is three inches, the centerline is 1-1/2 inches away from each line.)

How to Quilt Triangle Texture, Lori Kennedy, FMQ

Use this measurement to determine the cross lines.  (My crosslines were 1 inch apart.)

How to Quilt Triangle Texture, Lori Kennedy, FMQ

Mark the diagonal lines by drawing from the edge to the center lines.

How to Quilt Triangle Texture, Lori Kennedy, FMQ

STITCH THE TRIANGLES

Stitch the outlines of the triangles.How to Quilt Triangle Texture, Lori Kennedy, FMQ

How to Quilt Triangle Texture, Lori Kennedy, FMQ

Complete the row of triangles and then stitch down the right side to finish the outline.

How to Quilt Triangle Texture, Lori Kennedy, FMQ

Fill in the small triangles with very close straight line stitching.

The trick is to carefully fill into the corners to create the definition.
How to Quilt Triangle Texture, Lori Kennedy, FMQ
CHOOSING THE RIGHT THREAD

When I am adding this motif to a quilt, my primary goal is to create texture so I don’t want to call attention to the stitching.  Usually a subtle color contrast works best.  I generally choose a color similar to (but not an exact match) to the background fabric.  Any weight thread will work.How to Quilt Triangle Texture, Lori Kennedy, FMQ

PLAY WITH PROPORTIONS

Once you see how well this technique looks in quilts, I’m sure YOU will want to try different proportions and shapes!

What about YOU?

Does YOUR quilt need a little “pop” of texture?

Does YOUR quilt have a lot of flying geese?

What other shape would make YOUR quilt “pop”?

We’d LOVE to hear!

Signed,

Lori Redenbacher

PS…If you like these motifs and tips, be sure to check out my book, Free Motion Machine Quilting 1-2-3 or any of my Craftsy Videos!

PPS…All tutorials, images and information are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to re-blog, pin or share with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!

 

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June Birthday Flower of the Month-The Rose

 

Rose, Clemens Garden, St. CloudGood Morning, Quilters!

If your birthday was in June–Happy Birthday!

Roses are YOUR birth flower.

Roses mean love, honor, faith, confidence…depending on the color and have been grown for more than 5000 years!

ROSES ARE EASY!

Roses were my grandmother’s favorite flower–one half her yard was dedicated to formal roses,  but until recently, I was too intimidated to plant roses in my garden.  They seemed so fussy-special feedings, pruning…aphids!

Then I watched Paul Zimmerman’s Craftsy Class:  The Gardener’s Guide to Growing Roses.  It’s a very practical guide that takes the mystery out of growing roses, discusses the history of roses and helps you choose roses to suit your gardening personality-from low maintenance shrubs to more formal tea roses.   I now have more than a dozen roses (all low-maintenance) in my garden and I love them!

ALL CRAFTSY CLASSES ARE ON SALE!

It’s the perfect time to pick up a gardening class–or one of a machine quilting class!

Craftsy Sale

May I recommend:

Craftsy Title CardDoodle to Design, Craftsy, Lori Kennedy

MACHINE QUILTING ROSES

We have stitched two different rose motifs:

Nora’s Rose Machine Quilt Tutorial HERENora's Rose Free Motion Quilting thread samples

Rose quilt, Aurifil thread

And the messy spiral, Christmas Rose HERE

Christmas Rose, FMQ, Kennedy

ROSE PAPER PIECING

Our friend, Peggy created a Rose paper pattern HERE

Rose: Paper Piecing Pattern

The Rose-Pattern by Peggy Aare

May your quilts and your gardens be filled with roses!

Lori

PS…All tutorials, images and information are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to re-blog, pin or share with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!

 

 

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