What is the Best Way to Doodle? Open Line Friday

 

Boogie Board

Good Morning, Quilters!

What is the best way to doodle? My favorite way to doodle is on paper…any paper.

I doodle in sketchbooks, on newspapers, on envelopes. Any paper that dares get near my pen–watch out!

But…recently, I found a new way to doodle–a Boogie Board!

The Boogie Board is described as Liquid Crystal Paper.  Doodling is easy and everything erases with a click of the button.  The Boogie Board is not new, but the “blackboard” size is a recent addition to the line.  There are a variety of sizes including several designed for children that look great for learning penmanship or math facts.  The prices range from $12 to $45.

What I like most about the Boogie Board is how the pen and writing surface feel–they feel very natural. The liquid crystal paper has a nice “tooth”– it is not too slippery.

 

Machine Quilting, Lori Kennedy

 

We’ve been practicing our Tree Doodles HERE and HERE

This would be a great way to practice any motif and quickly erase, without the need to waste paper.
Machine Quilting, Lori Kennedy

PRACTICE DOODLING RIGHT OVER YOUR QUILT

The Boogie Board can be placed right over your quilt to audition motifs.

Perfect!
Boogie Board

HINTS

If you draw something you want to save…you have to take a photo of it.  There is a cell phone app to store and organize your doodles, but I haven’t tried it yet.

The Boogie Board has an eraser feature to erase part of a drawing.  In my opinion, it doesn’t work that well.

Quilt Applications:  This method is really best for practice doodles and to audition motifs.

OPEN LINE FRIDAY

What about YOU?

What’s YOUR favorite way to doodle?

Have YOU ever tried the Boogie Board?

We’d LOVE to hear!

Your Doodle Darling,

Lori

PS…Craftsy is on SALE!!! All classes less than $20!  (excludes Start up Library and The Great courses.)

PPS…This product review contains affiliate links.  If you choose to purchase at NO ADDITIONAL COST to you, The Inbox Jaunt may receive a little “pin money”.  Thank you for supporting us in that way!

…If you like these motifs and tips, be sure to check out my book, Free Motion Machine Quilting 1-2-3 or any of my Craftsy Videos!

PPS…All tutorials, images and information are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to re-blog, pin or share with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!

 

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Free Motion Quilting-The Quilt Back on my Work in Progress

 

Free Motion Quilting, Back of Quilt

Good Morning, Quilters!

Quilting proceeds slowly on my Boxes and Vines quilt.

How do you quilt a big quilt on a small domestic machine?

Little by little. One block at a time.

Sometimes it seems that I spend as much time shuffling the quilt as I do stitching!

Still, I enjoy the process. I love seeing the slow and steady progress.

Last week, a reader asked to see the back of the quilt.

What Fabric Is Best for the Back of a Quilt?

Normally, I do not recommend using hand dyed fabrics or batiks on the back of the quilt. These fabrics are very tightly woven and the sewing machine needle has a little more trouble penetrating the fabric. The small needle deflections can lead to a less than perfect stitch.

However, I decided to use hand dyed fabric this time because I had  it on hand and I didn’t want to spend time shopping.

Free Motion Quilting, Back of Quilt

This back is made of several large pieces of fabric.  I pieced it in an improvisational style–using scraps on hand.

If you are interested in creating a beautiful quilt back, check out Elizabeth Hartman’s FREE Craftsy class HERE:  Creative Quilt Backs

The video offers basic information on how to create a quilt back and how to design a creative backing.

Slowing Down Before the Holidays

As Christmas approaches, I know I will be a challenge to quilt every day…

But then again, there are a lot of other creative projects…

Wrapping, baking, decorating…

What about YOU?

How is YOUR work in progress?

Have you been working at least fifteen minutes every day?

What other creative projects do you have in the works?

We’d LOVE to hear!

Ho-Ho-Ho!

Lori

PS…If you like these motifs and tips, be sure to check out my book, Free Motion Machine Quilting 1-2-3 or any of my Craftsy Videos!

PPS…All tutorials, images and information are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to re-blog, pin or share with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!

 

 

 

 

 

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How to Machine Quilt a Candle-Tuesday Tutorial

Lori Kennedy Quilting, FMQ, Candle

Good Morning, Quilters!

Whether you are celebrating Advent or Hanukkah, candles are central to the holiday season.  Today, we will learn to machine quilt a candle.  This tutorial works whether you are stitching on a domestic sewing machine–like I do, or on a long arm.  Candles are great border motifs, or stitch a single candle or several candles together in the center of the block.

Christians celebrate Advent-a quiet time of preparation and waiting.  We light four candles on each Sunday of Advent.  The candles represent the light coming into the world as we prepare for Christ’s birth.  Read more at Loyola Press.

For Jews, Hanukkah is a celebration of the victorious Maccabean Revolt and the rededication of the Temple.  During the celebration, the candles are lit on eight nights to represent the miracle that one days worth of oil lasted eight days.  Read more at My Jewish Learning

HOW TO MACHINE QUILT A CANDLE

Begin by drawing two parallel lines.  In the sample below, the lines are 3/4″ apart.

Machine Quilting, Candle, Lori KennedyBegin stitching on the bottom of the candle.  Stitch the left side of the candle, then stitch a small eye shape.  Leave a small gap on the left side.

Lori Kennedy quilting, Candle

Curl in and stop at the center.  Stitch a small straight line extending above the oval.

Lori Kennedy quilting, Candle

Add a flame shape and a smaller flame inside of the first one.

Lori Kennedy quilting, Candle

 

Stitch down into the oval and to the left side of the candle.
Lori Kennedy Quilting, FMQ, Candle

Add a wavy line of dripping wax.

Lori Kennedy quilting, Candle

Stitch the right side of the candle and add a curved line from right to left.  Echo stitch the line.Lori Kennedy Quilting, FMQ, Candle

Add another line from right to left and echo stitch back to the right lower side of the candle.  Begin the next candle in the row..

Lori Kennedy quilting, CandleAdd candles to a wreath, Menorah, a birthday cupcake!Lori Kennedy Quilting, FMQ, Candle

The only trick to machine quilting a candle is to begin with a drawn line or a ruler to keep the edges straight.

I can see this on any holiday or celebration quilt.

How will YOU use the Candle FMQ Tutorial?

We’d LOVE to hear!

Lori

You might also like How to Machine Quilt a Dreidel HERE

PS…If you like these motifs and tips, be sure to check out my book, Free Motion Machine Quilting 1-2-3 or any of my Craftsy Videos!

PPS…All tutorials, images and information are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to re-blog, pin or share with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!

 

 

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