Quilt Sandwich Hurry-Up Recipe

 

Iron, silhouetteJust a quick tip for today…when you are making small quilt sandwiches for practice or for small vase quilts, you may be able to get by without basting… by ironing the three layers together.

I usually iron the top and back very carefully.  (If there are any wrinkles or folds visible in the fabric before you start free motion quilting, they will be there when you are finished, too–and they are much more difficult to remove after quilting!)

Then I steam the batting a little-if it has any major creases…

Finally, I layer the sandwich, smooth the back with my hand and then press it from the top.  This is enough to hold the layers together while I stitch.  I am not sure this method holds for a long period of time– I think it is a small amount of moisture from ironing that holds the layers.

Iron, silhouette

So the next time you’re in a hurry to get your ideas down on the fabric, give this method a try!

Iron, silhouetteFrom the Happy, hurried quilter,

Lori

PS…All photos, information, and tutorials are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to re-blog or Pin with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other uses, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thank you!

A Matter of Scale–A Sketchbook Assignment

Sketchbook, Doodle, Free Motion QuiltingCHOOSING MOTIFS AND SCALE

One of the challenges (and great joys) of free motion quilting is choosing a motif to match the style of our quilt tops.   (If you need any ideas…I think you can find a few HERE…)  Once you’ve chosen a motif,  the next decision is a matter of scale.  How big will you stitch the patterns?  I tend to quilt very small and fill even very large quilts with lots of quilting, but more open quilting is beautiful, too.    The important thing is to be consistent throughout the quilt.  (NOTE–The amount of quilting does not affect the softness of the quilt.  Softness is a function of batting and washing.)

DOODLE FIRST

All of the tutorials and motif patterns found on Tuesdays here at The Inbox Jaunt are stitched small for purposes of photography.  However, each of the patterns can be stitched in a much larger scale.  First practice the pattern by doodling it in different sizes on paper.  It’s important to get the feeling of the larger sweeps you will make to quilt the motif larger.

If you keep the motifs about the size of your hand or smaller, you should be able to move your quilt to create the pattern.  If the motif is too large, it will become unwieldy to handle the bulk of the quilt in your domestic sewing machine–We’ll leave very large motifs to the long armers!

Sketchbook, Doodle, Free Motion QuiltingHOMEWORK

Your assignment today… (should you choose to accept it)…Find a very large sheet of paper and try drawing any of the patterns in different sizes.   If you don’t have a large notepad, use a sheet of newspaper or a piece of freezer paper-anything will do.

Sketchbook, Doodle, Free Motion QuiltingFirst doodle the motif in a small size, then double it, then triple it.  When it gets larger does it still look as nice or do you need to add a little echo stitching.   Which size seems to fit your quilt top best?   Which size do you think you would be able to accomplish while moving a bulky quilt?  Try several of the tutorials and see which ones look best in larger sizes.

Keep Doodling and Noodling!

Lori

PS…All images, tutorials and information are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to re-blog and Pin and tell all your friends with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other uses, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com

The Daisy Chain–A Free Motion Quilt Tutorial

Daisy Chain, Free Motion Quilt Tutorial

Welcome back, Quilters!  It seems we need a little sunshine these days.  Minnesota is still miserably cold and we have several feet of snow on the ground.  Let’s follow the lead of our gardening friends and plant some seeds…We might as well dream about future daisies!

The Daisy Chain is a fresh, modern pattern that would look great on any “girlie” quilt.  This pattern can be made much larger and it can be adapted to an all-over pattern.  The Daisy Chain is the summer version of The Snowflake–the steps are very similar.

THE DAISY CHAIN TUTORIAL 

Begin by drawing three lines, equidistant apart.  In this tutorial, I used the grid stencil from The Stencil Company to create lines 1 inch apart.

Daisy Chain, Free Motion Quilt Tutorial

Begin stitching ON the line.  Stitch down approximately one inch and stitch a small circle.

Daisy Chain, Free Motion Quilt Tutorial

Stitch a thin petal, angle up and toward the left “rail”.

Daisy Chain, Free Motion Quilt Tutorial

Stitch two more petals on the left side of the center line.

Daisy Chain, Free Motion Quilt Tutorial

Stitch around the center circle and to the to the center line.  Avoid stitching ON the center circle to avoid a build up of thread.

Daisy Chain, Free Motion Quilt Tutorial

Next, stitch the remaining petals, finishing a the bottom of the circle.

Daisy Chain, Free Motion Quilt Tutorial

Stitch down on the center line and begin the next flower in your daisy chain.

Daisy Chain, Free Motion Quilt Tutorial

By staggering the daisies in each line, the pattern fills in nicely.   Sweet!

Whether (or weather?) or not there’s snow on the ground where you live, let’s chain together a few daisies while we wait for our seeds to sprout!

Happy Gardening,

Lori

PS…All tutorials, images and information are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to re-blog and Pin with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other uses, please contact me in the Garden Center at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Sweet!