A Modern Wholecloth Quilt for Autumn

Free Motion Quilting, Pumpkin, Acorn, Oak Leaf

It’s another glorious autumn morning here in Minnesota-the best days of the year!  I love all of the motifs of autumn-leaves, trees, pumpkins, corn…

Free Motion Quilting, Pumpkin, Acorn, Oak LeafI stitched this Modern Wholecloth Quilt with several Tuesday Tutorials:

Grid Pop

The Perfect Pumpkin

The Oak Leaf and The Acorn

Free Motion Quilting, Pumpkin, Acorn, Oak LeafThis Harvest quilt is small–just 15 inches square, but I know it will be used frequently throughout my house.

Free Motion Quilting, Pumpkin, Acorn, Oak LeafI used Aurifil cotton in the bobbin and Sulky 40 wt Rayon in off-white on top–on a Bernina 150, domestic sewing machine, without a stitch regulator.

Free Motion Quilting, Pumpkin, Acorn, Oak LeafThe acorns are in there, but because I stitched contour lines within the body of the acorns (see options in the Oak Leaf and Acorn tutorial), there is not enough contrast to see them clearly.  (I would leave them open next time so they “pop” like the Oak Leaves and The Grid.)

NOTE-Look closely to the left of the image above–an upside down acorn is visible.  On the right-the acorn with the contour is stitched, but not visible–not enough contrast….

Free Motion Quilting, Pumpkin, Acorn, Oak LeafI’m almost ready for Halloween! Hopefully there’ll be some candy corn left by October 31!?

Happy Harvest Stitching,

Lori

PS.  All images, information and tutorials are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to share with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!

Grid Pop-A Free Motion Quilt Tutorial

Grid Pop, Pumpkin Free Motion Quilting

 

Good Morning, Quilters!  Welcome back to Tutorial Tuesday.  Today we have two tutorials in one…

THE BASKET WEAVE AND GRID POP

To make a Grid Pop, start with the classic and beautiful Basket Weave.

The Basket Weave has been a perennial favorite among hand quilters and machine quilters alike.

It looks great behind any appliqué and fills in any background.

Grid Pop is more popular among machine quilters– you’ll see why once we get started.

THE BASKET WEAVE AND GRID POP TUTORIALS

Begin by drawing a grid.

For practice, a six-inch square is perfect.  (If your ruler is a bit bigger, go for that–make your life easy!)

Grid Pop, Free Motion quiltingBegin by drawing a square.  Then use a ruler to draw a diagonal line across the square.

(I love this 3-D Ruler purchased from an office supply store or drafting store.  It’s easy to grip.)

Grid Pop, Free Motion quiltingDraw one inch lines parallel to the first line across the square.  I like the Fons and Porter or SewLine mechanical pens and the Clover chalk wheel.  Frixion pens by Pilot are nice too.  (See Marking Pens)

Grid Pop, Free Motion quiltingRepeat the process in the opposite direction.

Grid Pop, Free Motion quiltingA diagonal one inch grid ready to stitch:

Grid Pop, Free Motion quiltingStart stitching on the center diagonal line.  Stitch right next to the line and  echo stitch back to the corner.

Next, stitch on the outer square to the next diagonal line and repeat the double row of lines.

Continue this way until the corner.

(NOTE-Because these lines are short, I decided to free motion quilt them.  You could use a straight stitch foot and sew the lines with feed dogs in the normal, UP position.)  I recommend you try one free motion quilting style and then make your decision based on the project…

Grid Pop, Free Motion quiltingContinue  across the top.   At the corner, switch directions and  stitch the perpendicular lines.

Grid Pop, Free Motion quiltingThe view from above:

Grid Pop, Free Motion quiltingContinue working around the square – filling in the double lines.

A Perfect Basket Weave!  

It’s gorgeous!  Stop here and your quilt will look great….OR….

Grid Pop, Free Motion quiltingGo for the GRID POP!

At the corner, stitch back and forth parallel to the top line to fill the 1/2 triangle on the side.

Continue down to the next triangle and repeat.

Grid Pop, Free Motion quiltingAt the bottom of the first row, stitch across one set of squares and begin filling in the first full row of squares.

Cut across the top and repeat until every other square is filled.

Grid Pop, Free Motion quiltingThis motif is one of my favorites–(Do I say that every week?)

The open squares just POP!  creating a stunning texture!

Grid Pop, Free Motion quiltingCLOSE UP:

Grid Pop, Free Motion quiltingThe Basket Weave (Upper Left)  and Grid Pop (Lower Right):

Grid Pop, Free Motion quiltingTomorrow:  The Rest of the Pumpkin, Oak Leaf, Acorn, and Grid Pop quilt…

Thursday:  Building a Rock Solid Routine for Free Motion Quilting:  Episode Four

I’m off to my sewing machine-and hoping that you are, too!

Pop-py sewing to YOU,

Lori

PS…All tutorials, images and information are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to share with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!

 

 

Feed Sack Paper Piecing Project-FREE today!

Feed sacks

A FAVORITE POST

One of my favorite posts and discussions at The Inbox Jaunt was September’s post on Feed Sacks.  The stories and comments generated were quite nostalgic and often funny.  (I loved the stories about the teenage boy clerks who would have to move bags and bags of meal in order to get the right fabric for the ladies…)   All of the stories were filled with history and Americana–thank you to all who shared!

PEGGY, THE PAPER-PIECING GURU,  AGREED

Peggy was also impressed by the memories garnered by the feed sack photos and was inspired to create this fabulous paper piecing pattern for us.

  Note from Peggy:

I did a quick full-sized line drawing for the War Eagle Mill feed sack. No color chart, no individual templates, but a simple plan that fits on 4 pages to finish at 12 ” x 16″. There are 6 pages in this PDF. The first is a color page, then 4 pages for the line drawing, and last is the template for the water with the original text superimposed on it for people to (trace and) sew as text outlines if they wish… A real FMQ project ! This probably all that’s necessary, though I can do a detailed plan like the others, if you wish.

Cheers,
Peggy

http://theinboxjaunt.com/2014/10/18/mending/http://theinboxjaunt.com/2014/10/18/mending/

Paper piecing project (6 pages) HERE

The house and the wheat above will be a fun project for the Fall.  I hope you enjoy this gorgeous pattern…

Please sign up for Flickr (click sidebar Flickr to take you to The Inbox Jaunt group)  and post the photos for all to see!

You may contact Peggy at PaperPiecingHeartland@gmail.com.

And be sure to check out her blog, Wisconsin Quilting 

THIS WEEK:

We have a busy week ahead–so get your bed made, and the rest of the house, too!

I think you’ll want to be stitching!

Let’s change the (quilting world)…one bed at a time!

Lori

PS…All tutorials, images and information are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to share with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!

This pattern is copyrighted by Peggy Aare.

If You Want to Change the World, Make Your Bed (with a quilt?)

 

LogCabin.HandDye.LKennedy002I think you will really enjoy this commencement speech by Naval Admiral William McRaven.  It was given this spring to graduates of the University of Texas at Austin.

Admiral McRaven offers ten life lessons beginning with:  If you want to change the world, make your bed.   (With a quilt was added by yours truly…)

The idea is that small daily disciplines lead to larger things…

Log Cabin Quilt, Hand dyed fabrics

The speech went viral on YouTube

or you can read the Transcript HERE

Something to think about while you are quietly quilting!

Lori

PS…All images, information and tutorials are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to share with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thank you!

Hand Dye, Log Cabin Quilt

Building A Rock Solid Routine-Machine Set-Up for Free Motion Quilting

Acorn and Oak Leaf Free Motion Quilting

Good morning, Quilters!

Hope you all had time to doodle and stitch yesterday’s free motion quilt tutorial:  The Oak Leaf and The Acorn.

If you didn’t have time, perhaps today’s discussion will help!

We are on #3 in our series:  Building a Rock Solid Routine for Free Motion Quilting–Machine Set-Up

One of the stalling points to the creative process is just not knowing how to begin.

So, to quote Julie Andrews…Let’s start at the very beginning, a very good place to start.  When you read you begin with A-B-C when you free motion quilt you begin with…

Corn Stalks Free Motion Quilting

Sorry, it doesn’t rhyme…Clean and Oil.

While that sounds like work, let’s not belabor the job.

Get it done fast…If you’re not sure how, pull out your manual.  (It  is in your newly organized Box of Free Motion Quilt Supplies and the page for cleaning and oiling is already marked.0

CHECKLIST-Ten Steps to Free Motion Quilting

  1. Clean and Oil
  2. Attach a single-hole throat plate (OPTIONAL-you might notice better stitch formation)
  3. Insert a bobbin (I like 50 wt cotton in the bobbin–use what you have.)
  4. Secure a Supreme Slider (I tape mine, but if yours is clean it should stay in place without tape.)
  5. Insert a New needle-(I usually start with a Topstitch 90-adjust according to your thread and fabric.)
  6. Attach Darning Foot (Bernina #24 is nice.)
  7. Thread machine (I like Sulky and Robison-Anton 40 wt Rayon–again use what YOU like.)
  8. Lower the feed dogs (or cover them)
  9. Needle down position (Whenever sewing stops, the needle will be in the down position–not available on all machines.)
  10. Test and adjust tension

I recommend that you copy these steps (in your neatest handwriting, of course) on to a nice piece of paper and keep it in your FMQ Supply Box.  Tape it to the lid if possible.

 The Checklist should be available for quick and ready reference–until you have it memorized.

Now here’s The Challenge:

My mom used to beguile me into cleaning my room by  telling me she’d time how long it took me to make my bed… This technique is very effective.

  • It increases focus.
  • It makes a boring job seem fun.
  • Teaches one to do menial tasks quickly so you can get on to the Fun Stuff.

Corn Stalks Free Motion Quilting

YOUR CHALLENGE:

Time how long it takes you to set up your machine for free motion quilting.  Try to get it down to under three minutes.  If you are organized and know the steps, that should be easy.

Then–the next time you have ONLY 15 minutes—You will be stitching for 12 full minutes--at that’s enough to get a good start!

“Sew–A needle pulling thread.  La-A Note to follow Sew…”

Singing and Sewing,

Lori

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE:

Building a Rock Solid Routine Series

  #1-Find and mark your sewing machine manual

  #2-Supply List and Organizing the Supplies

PS…All tutorials, information and images are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to re-blog, Pin and Share with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!

The Oak Leaf and Acorn-Free Motion Quilt Tutorial

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt PatternGood Morning, Everyone!   Hope you all enjoyed a busy Columbus Day sailing the high seas of adventure…

I spent the day fighting off a tidal wave of paperwork–Argh!    The good news….now I can Quilt without Guilt!

Fortunately, we don’t have to look far to find quilting inspiration these days– The Fall colors are  peak here in Minnesota and we’ve had some sunny skies to accompany the glorious color.

Today’s free motion quilt tutorial: The Oak Leaf and The Acorn

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt Pattern

The Oak Leaf, like most nature motifs, is very forgiving.  Most lines in nature are not perfect nor perfectly symmetrical, so even if your stitching is off a bit, The Oak Leaf will still look fabulous (I promise!).

Begin stitching a short stem.  Then add curved petal, followed by a larger curved petal.

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt PatternStitch the third petal smaller than the second…

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt Pattern

On the top, add a flame-shape.

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt PatternRepeat the shapes on the other side.  Don’t worry about perfect mirror images…anything close will look great.

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt PatternStitch a curvy stem through the middle of the leaf and echo stitch back out of the bottom of the leaf.  Add a small curl to serve as the top of the acorn.

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt PatternStitch out of the curl and then stitch a bean-shape with a point at the top.

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt PatternThe acorn:  bean shape with a point at the top…then echo stitch over the left side of the cap of the acorn.

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt PatternStitch a wavy line inside the cap of the acorn from left to right.

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt PatternFinally, stitch down to a point and back up to the cap.

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt PatternIf you like, add a few contour lines inside The Acorn– though it is not necessary.  Also, echo-stitching around each Oak Leaf gives the pattern a little more “oomph”–for lack of a better word.

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt PatternThis pattern can be use as a border or as an overall fill pattern.

I am working on a small quilt using The Oak Leaf and Acorn and should have it ready for you to see next week.

In the mean time, give this pattern a try on YOUR next quilt–no need to squirrel it away–there’s plenty more tutorials coming every week!

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE:

For some colorful inspiration and a photography trick for great tree photos, you might also like The Glorious Colors of Autum.

Also, other  free motion quilt tutorials for fall that you might like:

Signed,

Nuts-About-Free Motion Quilting,

Lori

PS…All tutorials, images and information are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to re-blog, Pin, share with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!