Feed Sack Paper Piecing Project-FREE today!

Feed sacks

A FAVORITE POST

One of my favorite posts and discussions at The Inbox Jaunt was September’s post on Feed Sacks.  The stories and comments generated were quite nostalgic and often funny.  (I loved the stories about the teenage boy clerks who would have to move bags and bags of meal in order to get the right fabric for the ladies…)   All of the stories were filled with history and Americana–thank you to all who shared!

PEGGY, THE PAPER-PIECING GURU,  AGREED

Peggy was also impressed by the memories garnered by the feed sack photos and was inspired to create this fabulous paper piecing pattern for us.

  Note from Peggy:

I did a quick full-sized line drawing for the War Eagle Mill feed sack. No color chart, no individual templates, but a simple plan that fits on 4 pages to finish at 12 ” x 16″. There are 6 pages in this PDF. The first is a color page, then 4 pages for the line drawing, and last is the template for the water with the original text superimposed on it for people to (trace and) sew as text outlines if they wish… A real FMQ project ! This probably all that’s necessary, though I can do a detailed plan like the others, if you wish.

Cheers,
Peggy

http://theinboxjaunt.com/2014/10/18/mending/http://theinboxjaunt.com/2014/10/18/mending/

Paper piecing project (6 pages) HERE

The house and the wheat above will be a fun project for the Fall.  I hope you enjoy this gorgeous pattern…

Please sign up for Flickr (click sidebar Flickr to take you to The Inbox Jaunt group)  and post the photos for all to see!

You may contact Peggy at PaperPiecingHeartland@gmail.com.

And be sure to check out her blog, Wisconsin Quilting 

THIS WEEK:

We have a busy week ahead–so get your bed made, and the rest of the house, too!

I think you’ll want to be stitching!

Let’s change the (quilting world)…one bed at a time!

Lori

PS…All tutorials, images and information are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to share with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!

This pattern is copyrighted by Peggy Aare.

If You Want to Change the World, Make Your Bed (with a quilt?)

 

LogCabin.HandDye.LKennedy002I think you will really enjoy this commencement speech by Naval Admiral William McRaven.  It was given this spring to graduates of the University of Texas at Austin.

Admiral McRaven offers ten life lessons beginning with:  If you want to change the world, make your bed.   (With a quilt was added by yours truly…)

The idea is that small daily disciplines lead to larger things…

Log Cabin Quilt, Hand dyed fabrics

The speech went viral on YouTube

or you can read the Transcript HERE

Something to think about while you are quietly quilting!

Lori

PS…All images, information and tutorials are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to share with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thank you!

Hand Dye, Log Cabin Quilt

Building A Rock Solid Routine-Machine Set-Up for Free Motion Quilting

Acorn and Oak Leaf Free Motion Quilting

Good morning, Quilters!

Hope you all had time to doodle and stitch yesterday’s free motion quilt tutorial:  The Oak Leaf and The Acorn.

If you didn’t have time, perhaps today’s discussion will help!

We are on #3 in our series:  Building a Rock Solid Routine for Free Motion Quilting–Machine Set-Up

One of the stalling points to the creative process is just not knowing how to begin.

So, to quote Julie Andrews…Let’s start at the very beginning, a very good place to start.  When you read you begin with A-B-C when you free motion quilt you begin with…

Corn Stalks Free Motion Quilting

Sorry, it doesn’t rhyme…Clean and Oil.

While that sounds like work, let’s not belabor the job.

Get it done fast…If you’re not sure how, pull out your manual.  (It  is in your newly organized Box of Free Motion Quilt Supplies and the page for cleaning and oiling is already marked.0

CHECKLIST-Ten Steps to Free Motion Quilting

  1. Clean and Oil
  2. Attach a single-hole throat plate (OPTIONAL-you might notice better stitch formation)
  3. Insert a bobbin (I like 50 wt cotton in the bobbin–use what you have.)
  4. Secure a Supreme Slider (I tape mine, but if yours is clean it should stay in place without tape.)
  5. Insert a New needle-(I usually start with a Topstitch 90-adjust according to your thread and fabric.)
  6. Attach Darning Foot (Bernina #24 is nice.)
  7. Thread machine (I like Sulky and Robison-Anton 40 wt Rayon–again use what YOU like.)
  8. Lower the feed dogs (or cover them)
  9. Needle down position (Whenever sewing stops, the needle will be in the down position–not available on all machines.)
  10. Test and adjust tension

I recommend that you copy these steps (in your neatest handwriting, of course) on to a nice piece of paper and keep it in your FMQ Supply Box.  Tape it to the lid if possible.

 The Checklist should be available for quick and ready reference–until you have it memorized.

Now here’s The Challenge:

My mom used to beguile me into cleaning my room by  telling me she’d time how long it took me to make my bed… This technique is very effective.

  • It increases focus.
  • It makes a boring job seem fun.
  • Teaches one to do menial tasks quickly so you can get on to the Fun Stuff.

Corn Stalks Free Motion Quilting

YOUR CHALLENGE:

Time how long it takes you to set up your machine for free motion quilting.  Try to get it down to under three minutes.  If you are organized and know the steps, that should be easy.

Then–the next time you have ONLY 15 minutes—You will be stitching for 12 full minutes--at that’s enough to get a good start!

“Sew–A needle pulling thread.  La-A Note to follow Sew…”

Singing and Sewing,

Lori

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE:

Building a Rock Solid Routine Series

  #1-Find and mark your sewing machine manual

  #2-Supply List and Organizing the Supplies

PS…All tutorials, information and images are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to re-blog, Pin and Share with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!

The Oak Leaf and Acorn-Free Motion Quilt Tutorial

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt PatternGood Morning, Everyone!   Hope you all enjoyed a busy Columbus Day sailing the high seas of adventure…

I spent the day fighting off a tidal wave of paperwork–Argh!    The good news….now I can Quilt without Guilt!

Fortunately, we don’t have to look far to find quilting inspiration these days– The Fall colors are  peak here in Minnesota and we’ve had some sunny skies to accompany the glorious color.

Today’s free motion quilt tutorial: The Oak Leaf and The Acorn

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt Pattern

The Oak Leaf, like most nature motifs, is very forgiving.  Most lines in nature are not perfect nor perfectly symmetrical, so even if your stitching is off a bit, The Oak Leaf will still look fabulous (I promise!).

Begin stitching a short stem.  Then add curved petal, followed by a larger curved petal.

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt PatternStitch the third petal smaller than the second…

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt Pattern

On the top, add a flame-shape.

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt PatternRepeat the shapes on the other side.  Don’t worry about perfect mirror images…anything close will look great.

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt PatternStitch a curvy stem through the middle of the leaf and echo stitch back out of the bottom of the leaf.  Add a small curl to serve as the top of the acorn.

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt PatternStitch out of the curl and then stitch a bean-shape with a point at the top.

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt PatternThe acorn:  bean shape with a point at the top…then echo stitch over the left side of the cap of the acorn.

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt PatternStitch a wavy line inside the cap of the acorn from left to right.

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt PatternFinally, stitch down to a point and back up to the cap.

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt PatternIf you like, add a few contour lines inside The Acorn– though it is not necessary.  Also, echo-stitching around each Oak Leaf gives the pattern a little more “oomph”–for lack of a better word.

Oak Leaf and Acorn Free Motion Quilt PatternThis pattern can be use as a border or as an overall fill pattern.

I am working on a small quilt using The Oak Leaf and Acorn and should have it ready for you to see next week.

In the mean time, give this pattern a try on YOUR next quilt–no need to squirrel it away–there’s plenty more tutorials coming every week!

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE:

For some colorful inspiration and a photography trick for great tree photos, you might also like The Glorious Colors of Autum.

Also, other  free motion quilt tutorials for fall that you might like:

Signed,

Nuts-About-Free Motion Quilting,

Lori

PS…All tutorials, images and information are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to re-blog, Pin, share with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!

Open Line Friday–Friday Finds and a Favor to Ask…

Clamp Light On Sewing MachineI was off at a quilt retreat last weekend with my Mom, sisters and friends.  I learned many new things AND

I discovered a few new products to share. Continue reading

Feed Sacks

Feed sacksLast Sunday,  I posted a photo of a vintage feed sack (with a football player on it) taken at The Pickwick Mill in Winona, Minnesota.

Several people left comments about their fond memories of feed sacks- collecting, trading and using them for quilts and clothes.

Feed sacksI thought you might like to see the rest of the photos…

Feed sacksThe designs are quite graphic and lovely.

Feed sacks

Feed sacks

Feed sacks

Feed sacks

 

Feed sacksPlease tell me…

Was the burlap sack just the outer layer with the floral feed sacks fabrics used for dresses and quilts an inner layer?

Or were the print feed sacks for a different product?

We’d love to hear more about feed sacks…

Please tell us YOUR feed sack story!

Regards,

Lori-the-girl-with-a-new-textile-obsession!

PS…All tutorials, images and information are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to share, pin, re-blog with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!