The Log Cabin Quilt and More

Log Cabin, Hand dye quiltGood Morning Quilters and Doodlers!

NOMINATE YOUR FAVORITE BLOGGER

I received this very kind note yesterday:

Lori, just thought I should let you know that I nominated you for the Best Overall Blogger Award through National Quilting Circle.  You can download a badge which might encourage your readers/followers to continue to nominate and then vote for you.

I did this because you are the only Blog that I follow regularly and the only one I continue to recommend to friends. Who by the way, also continue to follow you.

I have also learned more from you about FMQ then any other Blogger, or class I’ve taken. Good Luck!

So I’ve added the badge in my sidebar, and I thought we would give it a whirl!

(You can click on the photo below or on the badge in the sidebar!)

Blogger Nomination Form

Please consider nominating The Inbox Jaunt!

Log Cabin, Hand dye quiltTHE LOG CABIN TABLE RUNNER

In other news…

The Doodle Lessons seem to be going very well,  but most of the comments from yesterday’s assignment were about the quilt underneath the notebook!

I made a king sized version of this log cabin quilt (and quilted it on my BERNINA 820) a couple of years ago.  The table runner was made with orphan blocks to test threads and motif ideas.

Log Cabin, Hand dye quiltI used hand dyed fabrics-which gives it the incomparable color richness.

Each log is cut 1″, so the final dimension is 1/2″.  The center square is cut 2-1/2 inches.

Log Cabin, Hand dye quilt

I used Aurifil 30 wt cotton on top and 50 wt cotton in the bobbin to quilt it and wool batting (my favorite). It took less time to quilt than it did to figure out how to quilt it.  The king version hung in my sewing room for months because I was afraid to ruin it.  (Sound familiar?)  I tried several motif samples on this table runner and choose the one on the ends.

I liked how it created movement.

Log Cabin, Hand dye quiltNow, the larger version is on our bed.  (We had to re-paint the walls because they were so washed out next to this quilt!)

And the smaller one makes an occasional appearance on my kitchen table.

I love this happy, colorful quilt in my bedroom…

Log Cabin, Hand dye quiltAnd so does (naughty) Ruby!

Log Cabin, Hand dye quiltHope all your stitching is colorful and makes YOU happy!

Lori

PS…All tutorials, images and information are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to re-blog, pin or share with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!

 

Doodle Lesson Three: Slowing Down

Circle DoodlesHello Doodlers!

You don’t have to be a quilter to be a doodler–but I DO think it’s very helpful to be doodler if you’re a quilter!

Doodling helps you create patterns and develop an eye for balance.  It also helps create muscle memory for quilting motifs. Most of all-it’s FUN and ADDICTING…

WARNING-make sure all your tax and bank documents are well secured.  Once you get doodling–nothing is safe!

LESSON THREE

For the last two weeks we have worked on finding a few pens and papers and getting used to the act of doodling. We doodled Messy Spirals and Messy Lines and we didn’t worry about how they looked.  We worked fast to keep our left brain from interfering.

Today we are going to s-l-o-o-w down and work on control.  I call this lesson:

Circle Slow Down

Circle DoodlesPEN MATTERS

I found a new pen I like a lot–The Faber Castell PITT artist pen size small.  I have also been using a Flair pen a lot lately.  The Pen matters–make sure it feels right in your hand and flows well on the paper–not too fast and not too slow.

You can do this exercise on lined paper or unlined paper.

CIRCLE SLOW DOWN

Draw a row of circles starting with a small circle and then get larger.

Draw another row starting large and graduating to small.

Circle DoodlesDoodle two more rows of circles and fill them in with concentric circles.

(Try to control the pen so the ends of the circles meet neatly–see the last circle above–not neat.)

Circle DoodlesGo off the grid and draw a puddle of circles.

Circle DoodlesAdd straight lines between the rows and fill in some of the rows.  See how many different combinations you can create.

Circle DoodlesWARNING: This is more addictive than Pinterest!

Your circles will look like hand drawn circles–some slightly egg-y and some…

If we wanted perfect circles, we would have used a computer program!

Remember, you can always go back to Messy Circles and Messy Lines.

Doodling O-O-odles,

Lori

PS…All tutorials, images and information are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to re-blog, Pin or share with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!

The Dandelion Quilt-Revisited

Dandelion QuiltGood Morning, Quilters and Gardeners!

Any weeds in your garden (yet)?

Last week we worked on The Dandelion Free Motion Quilt tutorial and I made the little quilt below.

We discussed if the quilt below had enough quilting.-Read more HERE (see comments, too!).

Dandelion QuiltSome of you suggested I needed to add more, perhaps with a  neutral thread–

This adds a subtle, but interesting texture.  (Compare to The Scissors quilt--all the thread is the same.)

Dandelion Quilt I’m happy with the results.  I used Sulky Rayon to stitch the Dandelions and  Superior’s King Tut cotton in a color that matches the fabric for the background.  

Dandelion Quilt

Dandelion QuiltLESSONS LEARNED

  • More quilting is ALWAYS better?
  • Use a heavy weight thread (40 or heavier) with a sheen (like Rayon) in a contrasting color when you want to pop the quilting.
  • Use a low sheen thread of finer weight that matches the fabric when your goal is to add texture.

Dandelion Quilt

I think there’s a Thistle Quilt in our future!

Lori

PS…All tutorials, images and information are the property of Lori Kennedy of The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to re-blog, share or pin with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!

PPS. Aurifil 50 wt cotton in the bobbin, on my BERNINA820-a domestic sewing machine.

 

The Basic Bow–A Free Motion Quilt Tutorial

Basic Bow, LKennedy, FMQGood Morning, Quilters!

Hope you are all doodling and quilting, and maybe a little gardening??

It’s that time of year-Mother’s Day, Graduations, Picnics, parties.  I thought we could use a little festive motif–a pretty little bow.

The Basic Bow would look great on any baby quilt or girl’s quilt.  A single bow could be used to tie a quilt (stitch one in the center of every block)  Or stitch a chain of bows in a border.

For the Bow Border, begin by drawing two parallel lines 1-3/ inches apart.

Start in the middle-between the two lines.  Stitch a sideways figure “8”.

TheBasicBow.FMQ.LKennedy007Next, stitch a larger and slightly squared, figure eight.

TheBasicBow.FMQ.LKennedy006Stitch a wavy line down, to the point where the next bow will begin.  Stitch back to the center.

TheBasicBow.FMQ.LKennedy005Stitch down to the previous point and begin the next bow.

TheBasicBow.FMQ.LKennedy004To fill a large area with The Bow, draw a large grid–the sample below is a 2-1/2 inch square grid.

Stitch the bows at the intersections of each square.  Change the angle of the ribbon to create a lattice pattern to fill a very large area quickly.

TheBasicBow.FMQ.LKennedy003

Wouldn’t this be darling on a Baby Quilt?

TheBasicBow.FMQ.LKennedy002

TheBasicBow.FMQ.LKennedy001Keep doodling and stitching every day to see the fastest improvement in your free motion quilt skills.

Also, don’t forget to iron your quilts before stitching–even practice pieces!

I’m off to a baseball game-a sure sign that spring is here!

Go PIONEERS!

Lori

PS…This sample was stitched on Kona cotton with Sulky Rayon 40 wt on top and Aurifil 50 wt cotton in the bobbin.–on my Bernina 820-a domestic sewing machine.

PPS  All tutorials, images and information are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to blog, share, Pin with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!

Quilt-a-Doodle

Doodle.FMQGood Morning, Quilters and Doodlers!

I hope you are making good progress with your doodles!?

I just wanted to pop in and show you that doodles can become quilts…

Doodle.FMQIt’s even more fun to stitch Messy Spirals than it is to doodle them!

Doodle.FMQDon’t feel any pressure to stitch YOUR doodles–that might inhibit your creative process…on the other hand if the mood strikes–QUILT-A-DOODLE!

Lori

PS…This Quilt-a-Doodle was stitched with Superior’s Magnifico, trilobal polyester on top and Aurifil cotton 50 wt in the bobbin on my Bernina 820 (a domestic sewing machine) on Warm and Natural batting, Kaufman Kona cotton…

PPS…All tutorials, images and information are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt and are intended for personal use only.  Feel free to re-blog, Pin, share with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!

Doodle Lesson Two: Messy Lines

Doodle LessonsGood Morning, Quilters Doodlers!

Welcome back to Doodle Lessons!

JUST MINUTES A DAY

Whether your goal is to be a better quilter or more skilled at drawing…You’ve come to the right place! By practicing every day (at least 15 minutes) YOU will get better!

AND you don’t have to go to bed 15 minutes later or get up earlier–doodling can be done in “stolen moments”…while on the phone, waiting in a car, watching TV.   So NO EXCUSES for developing a “Doodle Habit”!

Doodle LessonsLIMITS

It often spurs creativity to limit some aspect of the process.  Last week we limited ourselves to circles–see Doodle Lesson One:  Messy Circles.

This week, we are adding Messy Lines.

  • Scribble up and down.
  • Make the lines bigger and smaller.
  • Change directions (first photo above)

Doodle LessonsThen add Messy Circles…

What does that look like?

Flowers?

Doodle LessonsSee if you can make it look even more like a field of flowers:

Doodle LessonsTry to make new combinations:

Doodle LessonsBy working on what seems like scribbles, patterns and associations emerge…

Watch for those new patterns…be mindful of the new designs…

That is the creative process at work… YOU are building CREATIVE MUSCLES!

Keep at the doodling…even when it seems meaningless.  If it’s not fun…try a new pad of paper or new pens, pencils, markers…Turn ON your creativity!

SCRIBBLE!

Tomorrow:  A Scribbled Quilt!

Lori

PS…All tutorials, images, and information are the property of Lori Kennedy at The Inbox Jaunt.  Feel free to Pin, Share, Tweet with attribution to The Inbox Jaunt.  For all other purposes, please contact me at lckennedy@hotmail.com.  Thanks!